Change Management: Art or Science?

Is helping others change an art or a science?

I think it’s both!  I recently spent a few minutes talking with Jeff Skipper of the Association of Change Management about the Certified Change Management Professional™ (CCMP™) certification.  I was beta participant and one of the first 75 people in the world to obtain complete the coursework pass the test, and become certified.

Interested in more information?  Check out the video of our discussion!

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3 Surprise Ways to Get Your Solution Adopted

Depending on your age, at least one of these three ‘format wars’ should sound familiar:

8 Track vs Cassette (Boomers)

Betamax vs VHS (Gen X)

Blu-ray Disc vs HD DVD (Gen Y)

I think there are at least three special things that helped the ‘winner’ in each of these ‘wars’.  I’ll be using a framework from a previous post (Want An Effective Solution? Work On Its Acceptance!) so take a read if the equation Q x A = E doesn’t sound familiar to you.

Lesson 1 – The ‘consumers’ of the change make the choice

The 8 Track was seen as the successor to vinyl records with the awesome feature of being able to skip to INDIVIDUAL SONGS!  In addition, they were much more portable than vinyl…and players could be installed in cars.

So why did the 8 Track lose out?  Price and reliability.  The cassette didn’t have a quality advantage but it was a few dollars cheaper and longer lasting.  Consumers chose based on their needs, not just product quality.

If you want your solution to be accepted, figure out what the ‘consumers’ of it need.

Lesson 2 – Quality isn’t always king

Sony’s Betamax format was more reliable and had higher resolution than JVC’s VHS format.  However VHS initially had twice the capacity and later four times (Beta’s 60 min vs VHS’ 240 min)…and this made all the difference.

Consumers didn’t want to switch tapes when recording a movie or sporting event, even if the resolution was better.

Don’t be fooled by thinking your solution will win out on quality alone.

Lesson 3 – Competitors can quickly become allies

From 2006 to 2008, Sony’s Blu-Ray and Toshiba’s HD DVD fought to become the standard for high definition video.  Cost was initially the differentiating factor with each solution having some minor technical differences.  Both companies quickly created alliances with manufacturers of consumer electronics as well as film studios.

Both sides had key wins in the ‘battle’ but the turning point was when Warner Brothers defected from HD DVD to Blu-Ray.  Within a few weeks, Blu-Ray was the clear winner as most other major manufacturers abandoned HD-DVD.

Keep your eyes open for possible alliances that can change the game.

 

 

We just covered a few lessons here…what have you experienced?

Image Credit: wikimedia.org

Why do I have to change when things are good?

There are people around you who are perfectly comfortable the way things are. But, you know things need to change – because of opportunities or threats that most people haven’t seen yet. So how do you help people who are comfortable move to a new, better place?

The late Dr. Michael Hammer was a gifted teacher and I once heard him discuss “Everything I Needed to Know About Transition I Learned in the Bible.” His premise: How do you make people see a need for change when things are good?

Show them how things can go bad.

The Hebrew people were in slavery to the Egyptians. They had to make mud bricks all day and build these huge pyramids in the baking sun. No fun. The relative safety and abundant food made them satisfied and when Moses arrived on the scene announcing it was time to move to a great new place (the ‘Promised Land’) he didn’t get much buy in.

IMG_0251

Hey Moses, are you sure there’s a better place than this?

Sound like any change you’ve been involved in?

So, how were the Hebrews convinced to leave this difficult yet comfortable place? Moses combined a burning platform (“Pharaoh is chasing us!”) and a motivating vision (“A land flowing with milk and honey!”)

After escaping Pharaoh, Moses led the people into the Sinai Desert.   They had gone from Egypt (bad) to the Desert (very bad). No constant water supply, harvesting a miraculous food supply, moving regularly. They surely longed for the “good old days.” That is, until they crossed the Jordan River and arrived in the “Promised Land.” And it was good.

So, do you need to move people to a “promised land” that they don’t want to visit? Take a lesson from Moses. Help them understand how now is bad, take them (if only in their imaginations) to a place that’s worse, and then lead them to the promise that is held by the future.

Read a summary of the Israelites Exodus from Egypt here
Image of Pyramids and Spinx © 2006-2016 Kenneth E. Fields

Want An Effective Solution? Work On Its Acceptance!

General Electric’s Change Acceleration Process introduced a very powerful equation: Q x A = E.  While not on par with more famous equations like Einstein’s (E=MC²) or Pythagorus’ (A²+B² =C²), Q x A=E holds the keys to successfully getting your solution adopted.  Let’s break it down.

Q = Quality

A = Acceptance

E = Effectiveness

An awesome technical solution would have a high “Quality” score.  A solution that all stakeholder love would have a high “Acceptance” score.  Say you want to buy the best 65″Ultra HD 4K TV in the store.  You’ve done all the research and decide to buy near the top of the line.

TVs_for_sale

Pick a TV, any TV!

Quality = 9

But say your significant other thinks that money would be better spent on a family vacation and will remind you of that fact every time you turn on the TV.

 Acceptance = 4

so, Effectiveness = 36

What if you decided to skimp on quality a little and pay half the price?  I mean are the differences really noticeable to the average viewer?

Quality = 7

and you used that money to go to the beach so that you were able to watch the new TV without fear of commentary?

Acceptance = 8

so, Effectiveness = 56

Winner!

This logic applies to personal changes (changing towns, homes, schools…) as well as professional ones (new benefits programs, software packages, office space).  So, next time you have to find a solution to a problem, don’t just look for the best “Quality” solution, spend some time thinking about “Acceptance” too!

 photo credit: wikimedia.org

The Secret of the Amazing People That Hold the World Together

Have you been in a public restroom lately?  Take a minute and think about what it looked like…

  • Was there toilet paper all over the floor but none in the stalls?
  • Was the mirror nearly opaque?
  • Did the soap work and were there towels?

Toilet_paper_orientation_over

Silly questions you might think…odds are high that there were toilet paper and towels, and the mirror was (relatively) clean.  So, why was that area not an absolute disaster?

Maintenance.

Clearly, someone has the responsibility of keeping that area clean.  In most public restrooms, you can find the ‘hour by hour’ chart that is kept to show that regular maintenance is done.  When that maintenance is not done, we notice!

The same is true with many things in today’s world but we can forget that if the grass is to be mown, the floors cleaned, and the plants watered, someone has to make it happen.

In her article How ‘Maintainers,’ Not ‘Innovators,’ Make the World Turn, Laura Bliss reminds us that, while “new technologies and their inventors [like Steve Jobs, Bill Gates, Elon Musk and Larry Page] are often celebrated as society’s heroes,…the human-built world is maintained and sustained—so often by unnamed, unseen, and underpaid labor.”

Like the public restroom, maintenance isn’t usually appreciated until we miss it.  Sometimes, deferred maintenance can result in disaster like the fire protection system failure at the World Trade Center on 9/11, the levee failures in New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina, and collapse of the I-35W Mississippi River bridge in Minnesota.  All well known examples of a little-recognized issue.

So, next time you celebrate innovation, don’t forget to take a look behind the scenes and look for the many maintainers that make it possible!

 

Are you brave enough to do the wrong thing?

Theodore Roosevelt, the 26th President of the United States, is consistently ranked as one of the greatest U.S. Presidents.  In fact, he’s held in such high regard that his face is carved into Mount Rushmore in South Dakota alongside three other great presidents.

However, did you know that he had a pretty incredible number of setbacks?

  • He suffered from asthma as a child
  • Roosevelt’s first wife died two days after giving birth…and his mother died the same day in the same house
  • After those dual tragedies, he became a cattle rancher in the Dakotas…and blizzards destroyed his herd
  • He won his first election (New York State Assembly) and lost his second (New York City Mayor)

His exploits became legendary after these potentially devastating losses.  He became the equivalent of Secretary of the Navy, formed the famous Rough Riders, served as Governor of New York, U.S. Vice President, and U.S. President.  While President, he ordered construction of the Panama Canal AND won the Nobel Peace Prize.

Theodore Roosevelt

Roosevelt was able to have a good laugh, even after some significant setbacks

How did Roosevelt progress from the early setbacks in his life?  I found this quote that really challenges me:

In any moment of decision, the best thing you can do is the right thing, the next best thing is the wrong thing, and the worst thing you can do is nothing. – Theodore Roosevelt

Today, I’m striving to do SOMETHING…and I hope you will too!

photo credit: mentalfloss.com

Want your changes to last? Look in the refrigerator!

A few weeks into the new year, people are trying valiantly to keep their resolutions.  Some even look to others as accountability partners or coaches.  Those types of people can make a huge difference in our lives.  However, individual commitment is the most important key to success.  Let’s take a look at our friend, the egg.

If broken from the outside, a life ends…

Broken Egg

but if it is broken from the inside…

Chick in egg

a life begins!

So, when you want to see yourself make a change or help others, remember, the big changes in life start from the inside!

Photo Credits:
http://imblog.ideaglow.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/chick-in-egg.jpg
http://www.dailyperricone.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/Broken-Egg.jpg

Outsourcing Manhood

After seeing the results of several rounds of outsourcing, it’s clear that a successful outsourcing requires a significant investment by both the outsourcer and the company.  Often, the company that is outsourcing their system or organization underestimates the amount of work needed to kick off and maintain the relationship.  This leads to frustration that the outsourcer “just doesn’t get it” when, in fact, they aren’t getting paid to be mind readers!

Outsourcing...it's one way but not the only way!

That analogy came to mind recently when I tried to outsource part of the journey to manhood of my two sons.  I didn’t approach it intentionally, in fact, it took a couple of years before I realized what I was doing.  It helped that my wife stayed close enough to the situation so I didn’t shoot myself in the foot!

I spent my childhood and most of my young adult years in a Christian scouting organization.  When my older son was old enough to join, we went to a local church that offered the same program (even though it wasn’t ours).  He never seemed to love the program like I did and his younger brother wasn’t a fan either so we went ‘shopping’ for a better option…or should I say a better outsourcer.  We looked at several alternatives and ended up participating in a group at our local YMCA called Adventure Guides.  After the first event, all I did was complain that it didn’t meet my (unexpressed and not well understood) expectations.  I was guilty of many of the same errors first time outsourcers make and I didn’t even know I was in the market!

I’ve come to the realization that I need to be the main supplier of experiences on my sons’ journey if I want to ensure that they arrive when and where I think they should.  If I want to entrust that responsibility to anyone else, I’ll need to be almost as involved as I would be if I did it myself.  And it makes me wonder, what other areas of my life am I unintentionally outsourcing.

How about you?  Are there any areas in your life that you’ve been unintentionally outsourcing?  Let’s talk about what you can do to be more engaged there in the comments section below!

Photo Credit: https://www.workhoppers.com/blog/6-steps-for-successfully-outsourcing-your-project/

Heroism Takes Practice

As a father, I want to raise my sons in Hero Training School whether they realize it or not.  I certainly hope that my actions and words have an impact on the man, husband, and father they want to be.  But, at the same time, if I want them to be ready when called upon, they need hero practice.

Heroes In Training @ Paris Mountain State Park - April 2014

Heroes In Training @ Paris Mountain State Park – April 2014

My sons naturally want to ‘play’ hero as they will often emerge dressed as Spider-Man, a Sheriff, or Peyton Manning.  However, there are (at least) two types of opportunities that I have to help them develop ‘personal heroism’:

1) Unplanned events – those teachable moments when you help them understand that making fun of others is not acceptable or how to be patient when learning a new skill (like tying their shoes).  My biggest enemy to success in unplanned events is just that…they’re unplanned.  I’m a big planner.  Most days in my life have a high level plan (go here, do this, etc.) and those plans don’t usually include taking an extra five minutes before we leave to review (insert your choice of skill or character quality here).  Those 5 minute delays don’t have an earth-shattering impact on my plan but they just might on my kids.

2) Planned events – times when you know the activity is going to be hard but you intentionally schedule it.  It could be anything from learning to ride a bike to rock climbing.  It doesn’t even have to be something you have personally mastered.  I know one dad who learned to kayak with his son…showing that Dad doesn’t have it all figured out either.  The challenge to these events is planning them.  Can you sacrifice one Saturday of errands or one week night of personal time to help your child accomplish something?  It’s all about intentionality.

I’m making a commitment to join ‘Hero Training School’ as an intentional instructor not a reluctant replacement.  How about you?

Hero Training School – The Softer Side

I recently wrote about how I had the opportunity to attend Hero Training School as a result of my father’s example which was influenced by his father’s example.  For several reasons, I need to take a minute to recognize my mother’s contribution to my ‘Hero Training School’ experience as well.  Why?

  1. She beat the crap out of cancer almost 20 years ago
  2. She retired early so she could take care of my dying grandmother for almost 3 years
  3. My wife makes it clear that I am more like her than I would care to admit.  (That little voice in my head worrying about how people perceive me?  Pure Mom.)
  4.  She reads my blog! 🙂
Three generations, November 2012

Three generations, November 2012

How does a mother contribute to her son’s ‘Hero Training School’? One big thing she can do is to let him know how special he is.  My Mom has been a personal cheerleader through life.  Through choices and changes, she’s stayed amazingly positive (even if us moving to France soon after having the first grandchild was hard for her to take…).

I see my wife taking the same cheerleader role for our sons.  She constantly reminds our older son that he’s ‘strong, smart, and studly’, even as he assures us that he feels anything but that.  Moms, don’t forget that your children (sons especially) need someone to support them throughout life’s changes.